Resources available in Nicaragua Revolution: David Schwartz Collection collection

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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Completed in 1983, The Supreme Dream of Bolívar was located on la avenida Bolívar, Managua. Unfortunately, the majority of this mural was destroyed on October 25, 1990, after the Sandinistas lost the elections, and the rest of the mural was destroyed in 1991. Both artists of this mural, Víctor Canifrú and Alejandra Acuña Moya, were Chilean exiles. The mural was painted 200 years after the death of Simón Bolívar, who was a symbol of independence for many Latin American countries. There are many segments of the mural, and there are not many photographs of the mural, especially of the entire mural. One segment of the mural depicts the United States as a grim reaper, as the U.S., Spain, and Christianity were used as tools of cultural oppression in Latin American countries such as Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is a group of unidentified statues, which appear Mayan-like. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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David Schwartz, the photographer who took all of the slides in this collection, is pictured with a statue in front of Hotel Ticomo, which still exists in Managua, Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is a woven tapestry of a woman. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is the Rubén Darío monument, still located in Managua, Nicaragua near the Plaza de la revolución. Rubén Darío was a famous Nicaraguan poet who spurred modernism, a 19th century literary movement. Although he passed away in 1916, the statue contains the year 1933. This is because the monument was recently refurbished after the original 1933 statue. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Three people are standing by the sign: "Somos Americanos...Amigos de Nicaragua Libre..." The English translation is "We are Americans...friends of free Nicaragua." Some of the sign is not pictured, so this may not be the full text. In the background of the image is Carlos Fonseca's tomb. at the Plaza de la revolución located in Managua, Nicaragua. Fonseca founded FSLN, the leftist political party in Nicaragua and was killed fighting against the Somoza dictatorship. He lived from June 23, 1936 until November 8, 1976. The bottom of the tomb reads "Carlos es de los muertos que nunca mueren," which in English is translated to "Carlos is of the dead who never die." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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An unidentified monument appears to be located in Managua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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"Los Estados Unidos ayudan con armas al ejercito Salvadoreño en su lucha contra el pueblo y esto es un crimen" ~Monseñor Romero. In English, the quote reads "The United States helps the Salvadoran army with arms in its fight against the people, and this is a crime." Monseñor Óscar Romero served as Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Salvador and spoke out against social injustice and violence by the government and encouraged his people to stop carrying out government orders to kill. He was shot and killed while celebrating mass. To the left of the quote is the acronym C. N. S. P., which stands for Consejo Nacional de Seguridad Pública, or in English, "National Council of Public Safety." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Children with David Schwartz in the middle are pictured in front of a poster that reads: "Diciembre victorioso muerte al somocismo." The English translation is "December Victorious Death to Somocismo." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A billboard with a dove and a map of Nicaragua reads: "Pueblos del mundo queremos la paz para centroamerica." The English translation is "People of the world want peace for Central America." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A billboard reads: "Todas las armas al pueblo! CDS para derrotar la agrecion." The English translation is "All weapons to the people! CDS to defeat the aggression." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A sign reads: "Responderemos al llamado del Servicio Militar Patriotico." The English translation is "We will respond to the call of the Patriotic Military Service." Four women are pictured walking. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A poster reads: "Cada casa una invecible trinchera Sandinista." The English translation is "Every House an Invincible Sandinista Trench." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A poster with Uncle Sam holding a big stick reads: "La historia de gran garrote". The English translation is "The history of the big stick." In addition, countries and dates are listed, including: Nicaragua 1933, Cuba 1961, Vietnam 1975, Angola 1976, and finally, Centro América 1983... The ellipsis signifies that this struggle is not over and is to be continued. All of the countries and dates represent numerous struggles where the United States was involved, and the poster negatively depicts this influence. Uncle Sam, representing the U.S., appears to be attacking and remaining victorious over the other nations, until the end where his stick, U.S. influence, has shrunk in size. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is a billboard with five men: Jose Benito Escobar, Jorge Navarro, Pablo Ubeda, German Pomares, and Faustino Ruiz. All of these men held ranks in the Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional (FSLN). Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
[0.19180297851562]

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