Resources available in Nicaragua Revolution: David Schwartz Collection collection

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"FSLN," the acronym for political party "Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional," or in English, Sandinista Front of National Liberation, is pictured on a mountain in Nicaraguan. The mountain remains unidentified. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is a street view of Matagalpa. The book store still exists on Avenida José Dolorese Estrada, Matagalpa, Nicaragua. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is what appears to be a family outside their home in Nicaragua. The family appears to be preparing food and is outside along with animals and laundry. The town remains unidentified. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A BlueBird Bus with the license plate number MA KY 911. The orange on blue license plate, which would have been found in Nicaragua from 1981-1985, also reads: "Nicaragua libre, centro america," or in English, "Free Nicaragua, Central America." The bus has the graffiti letters "BSRN" and several stickers, including an FSLN sticker with a representation of Augusto Sandino. Two young men are also pictured. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The historic building appears to be a cathedral. It is visually similar to the Cathedral of León, though the cathedral pictured remains unidentified. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A sign indoors with Augusto Sandino pictured reads: "A. C. Sandino: patria o morir!!!" The English translation is "free homeland or death!!!" Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The sign above the billboard reads: "La marcha hacia la victoria del pueblo nadie la detendra El Salvador triunfara. C. N. S. P." The billboard reads: "Avenida: Inmolacion Patriotica 18 de Mayo. Morir por la patria, es vivir : eternamente. Compañeros en el sacrificio." Below are four names and images of men, including Edwin Castro Rodríguez, Ausberto Narváez Parajón, Cornelio Silva Argüello, Rigoberto López Pérez. The first three men were assassinated in prison by the Somoza regime for their participation in the Sept. 21, 1956 bombing. Here is a newspaper article from El Nuevo Diario covering their deaths: http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/especiales/74502-dia-hienas-carceles-aviacion/ Rigoberto López Pérez was a Nicaraguan poet, artist, and writer who assassinated President Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García in the Sept. 21, 1956 bombing but was instantly killed afterward. Somoza's son, Luis Somoza Debayle, became president shortly after.  To the right of the men is a quote by Edwin Castro Rodríguez: "Mañana hijo mio todo sera distinto se marchará la angustia por la puerta del Fondo que han de cerrar para siempre las manos de hombres nuevos." The English translation is: "Tomorrow, my son, everything will be different, anguish is going through the back door, which the hands of new men will close forever." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The poster, which appears to be attached to a public transportation bus, reads: "Norte-americanos solidarios con la revolución nica." The English translation is "North Americans in solidarity with the Nicaraguan revolution." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Pictured is a Nicaraguan boy standing against a stone wall. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The middle sign in color is a poster affiliated with the Witness for Peace and reads "Acción permamente cristiana por la paz," an indirect Spanish translation of the Witness for Peace organization. In addition, the poster reads: "Oramos Por Uds. Y Por La Paz," which in English is translated to "We pray for you and for peace." A poster in the left toward the background of the image is written in English: "We Americans Oppose U.S. Aggression Against Nicaragua." David Schwartz, photographer and previous professor of Albright College, participated in this peaceful protest and others through his involvement in the Witness for Peace. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The portrait of Augusto Sandino, Nicaraguan revolutionary leader, reads: "Solo los obreros y los campesinos irán hasta el fin." The English translation is "Only the workers and peasants will go until the end." Red and black are used to represent the colors of the FSLN flag. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Portrait of Rigoberto López Pérez, Nicaraguan revolutionary leader who assassinated President Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García. Red and black are used to represent the colors of the FSLN flag. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A poster on the building contains the quote often quoted by Augusto Sandino in Nicaraguan political billboards and art: "Solo los obreros y campesinos llegaran hasta el fin, solo su fuerza organizada nos dara la victoria." The English translation is "Only the workers and peasants will last until the end, only your organized strength will give us the victory." The building contains two additional posters. One appears to be a portrait of Carlos Fonseca, founder of FSLN. Another, which may be a representation of Augusto Sandino as the trademark sombrero indicates, pictures a man holding two rifles surrounded by words that are not entirely clear. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A poster on a building contains the quote often quoted by Augusto Sandino in Nicaraguan political billboards and art: "Solo los obreros y campesinos llegarán hasta el final." The English translation is "Only the workers and peasants will go until the end." The quote is signed with a painted signature of A. C. Sandino. Red and black, the colors of the FSLN political party and flag, border the painting. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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Statue portrait of Carlos Fonseca, founder of leftist political party FSLN, which stands for "Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional," or in English, "Sandinista National Liberation Front." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The billboard reads: "Tu leche es insustituible y llega con amor." The English translation is "Your milk is irreplaceable and it comes with love." An image to the left of the text pictures a woman breast feeding her infant. The bottom right corner of the poster indicates it is sponsored by the "Ministerio de Salud," or in English, Nicaragua's "Ministry of Health." In addition, the bottom center has the letters "COPA," which may be an organization acronym or could be "copa," which in English can be translated to drink. Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The poster reads: "A problemas sociales soluciones comunales. Bienestar social. A satisfechar a las necesidades basicas a traves del trabajo productivo y organizado por compartiendo los logros sociales." The English translation is "For social problems communal solutions. Social welfare. To meet basic needs through productive work organized by sharing social achievements." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The poster reads ""la navidad en la revolución del hombre nuevo," or in English, "Christmas in the revolution of the new man." The bottom indicates that the poster is backed by the "Ministerio de Bienestar Social," or Ministry of Social Wellbeing. Pictured is an infant, implied to be the baby Jesus, with six adults hovering over him. The adults include a diverse group of men and women, from workers to soldiers, and one of the men may be a representation of Augusto Sandino, as the iconic sombrero indicates. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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The poster reads: "En diciembre victorioso Muerte al Somocismo." The English translation is "In Decembre victorious death to Somocismo." The letters are written in red and black, the colors of the FSLN political party and flag. A statue is seen in the background. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1984.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
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A Nicaraguan boy is seen pointing to newspaper clippings with headlines such as: "MPS combaten infiltracion contra en Jinotega norte," which translates to MPS combat infiltration against in Jinotega north and "Reagan esta en un callejon sin salida," which in English translates to "Reagan is on a dead end street." Archived by Leah Williams. Photographed by Professor David Schwartz, Albright College, 1981.
by David Schwartz Collection, Albright College
[0.21796011924744]

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